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Collier's Weekly, March 14, 1942 Issue PDF - Previous Issue / Next Issue
16 Articles, 64pp

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^ U T ^ ^ADIO
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FIT and MATCH
AllCors-OMorNew
U O N ' T let the hours you
spend in your car be
NEWS BLACKOUTS. Get
the war bulletins . . . the
news roundups, the official
instructions . . . the
aleil warnings on your
Motorola! In a world at
war radio is not a luxury.
I t 's a real necessity.'
MODELS in STOCK
for Immediate Installation
Motorola with its exclusive
VITA»TONE reception
is the only car radio that
FITS and MATCHES your
car perfectly regardless of
age, make or model.
Motorola models are
easily transferred from
One Car to Another.
See a Motorola Dealer Today
•^orV/'^^J CAR
^ ^ - ^ H ^ ^
WAITES DAVENPORT PoUlies
AIMEE LARKIN Distaii
QUENTIN REYNOLDS England
KYLE CRICHTON Screen and Theater
KENNETH LITTAUER Fiction
JAMES N. YOUNG Fiction
MAX WILKINSON Fiction
WM. O. CHESSMAN Art
HENRY L. JACKSON Fine Feathers
GURNEY WILLIAMS Humor
DENVER LINDLEY
FRANK D. MORRIS
CLARENCE H. ROY
W. B. COURTNEY
FRANK GERVASI
MARTHA GELLHORN
JIM MARSHALL
ROBERT MCCORMICK
IFOR THOMAS
Artielet
Arlielei
Syntax
Germany
South America
Articlei
West Ceait
Washington
Ph olographs
ANY WEEK
WHEN Pvt. Frank Joseph Motto, Jr.,
was told his picture would appear on
this week's cover, he said he didn't believe
it. Q.E.D. Our subject is shown
dressed as an infantryman in the
special winter clothing designed for
the colder-than-Alaska temperatures
found at Pine Camp, N. Y. Under his
steel helmet, Motto wears a heavy,
woolen toque. Around him is an alpaca-
lined coat, and he holds a Garand
rifle in his wool-o.d.-gloved hands.
Normally, 25-year-old Pvt. Motto
drives a peep for 4th Armored Division
staff officers. Having played semipro
basketball in New York City, where he
used to be a shipping clerk. Motto's
main off-duty diversion is playing the
game with the crack Division Headquarters
quintet. Seven of his ten
months at Pine Camp were spent on
the M.P. force.
A LITTLE belatedly we received
word from Mr. Wingate Cram of
Bangor, Maine, that the only woman
victim of that state's hunting season
was a lady who received a load of
buckshot in her left knee "having been
taken for a rabbit." We have a protest
from a soldier who wants to know
whether the main function of the Dies
Committee is to "ferret out Reds that
they might be employed without delay
by the federal government." And Mr.
Wilmot Townebery of Savannah,
Georgia, protests vigorously against a
speech published in the Congressional
Record wherein a supercharged legislator
describes the American people
as "looking resolutely at once at our
foes across the Pacific and our enemies
on continental Europe." Mr.
Townebery insists that this can't be
done simultaneously except, perhaps,
by a member of Congress, "even in
these completely acrobatic days." Also
Mr. Gurney Williams, the editor who
picks our cartoons for us, has just received
a three-layer chocolate cake
studded with four candles. It's from
Mr. Stanley Stamaty, a cartoonist of
Cincinnati, Ohio. The cake, wired Mr.
Stamaty, is "to celebrate the fourth
consecutive year in which I have sold
no cartoons to Collier's." And recently
we almost ate in a restaurant near
Cape Charles, Virginia. A sign in the
window read: "Try one of our steaks
and forget the war." We'd have gone
in had we not spoken to a soldier just
emerging. "Don't do it," warned he.
"Those steaks are Hitler's best
friends." A letter from Mr, Dan Elegone
of Memphis, Tennessee, urges us
to sponsor The Elegone Plan. It would
limit members of Congress and of state
legislatures to pay of twenty-one dollars
a month for the duration.
MUCH to our amazement a large
portion of our readers appear to be
somewhat confused by what's happening
in the Pacific. If anyone had
told Mrs. Mary Oliphant Coin of Seattle,
Washington, a year ago that Japan,
with her hands full in China,
could have taken on the United
States and the British Empire in addition,
plus the Dutch, and kick them
in the teeth collectively, she would
have reported such a person to the
nearest cop as a person too insane to
be at large. Nevertheless, Japan is doing
precisely that at the moment and
Mrs. Coin admits that she's having
some trouble understanding it. "Of
course, I'm only a housewife with a
husband in a defense job, a son in the
Navy and a batch of books filled with
defense stamps. So I wouldn't know.
Therefore, I wish you'd explain why
Japan, who was getting licked by
China, has managed to save herself
from that humiliating experience by
taking on Britain and the United
States. The Chinese were doing fine
until we got into the war."
AND that reminds us that a young
defense worker in East Hartford, Connecticut,
recently waved the contents
of his pay envelope—eighty-seven
dollars—under the nose of a twentyone-
dollar soldier on guard duty at the
plant gate. "Look, sucker," jeered the
worker. The soldier laid down his
rifle and proceeded to beat the b'joy
out of the fellow. This attracted quite
a crowd, including several plant officials
who promptly fired the worker
(Continued on page tX.)
Vol 109 No 11. Entered as second-clasa matter at Post Ofllce, Sprlngfleld. Ohio. U. S. A., under Act ol March 3,
1879 and at Post Office Department. Ottawa. Canada, by The Crowell-Colller Publishing Company, Sprlngfleld,
Ohio Publishers of Woman's Home Companion. The American Magazine, Collier's. Copyright, 1942, The Crowell-
Colller Publishing Company, in the United States, Canada and Great Britain. Executive and Editorial Offices:
250 Park Avenue. New York, N. Y.; 6 Henrietta Street. Covent Garden. I^ndon. Published weekly at Springfield.
Ohio, U S A . Joseph P. Knapp. Chairman of the Board: Thomas H. Beck. President: Albert E. Winger. Executive
Vice President and Treasurer; John S. Brehm, Vice President: William P. Larkin, Vice President: J. A. Welch,
Vice President: T. L. Brantly. Vice President: A. H. Motley, Vice President: Denis O'Sullivan, Secretary. Manuscripts
or art submitted to Collier's, The National Weekly, should be accompanied by addressed envelopes and
return postage. The Publisher assumes no responsibility tor return of unsolicited manuscripts or art. Price, S cents
a copy to the United States. S2.00 a year, two years »3.50, three years t6.00 in the United States and Possessions,
Argentina Bolivia, BraiU. Chile. Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba. Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador. Guatemala,
Haiti, Hondur-Colonies Uruguay and Venezuela. Price In Canada, 7 cents a cony. $3.00 a year, two years $5.oo, three years $7.00.
Other foreign subscriptions including postase: S5.50 a year. Remit by postal or express money order or check in
United States funds to The Crowell-ColHer Publishing <'o'"n!>ny, Sprlagfleld, Ohio. Changes of address should
reach us five weeks In advance. Give both old and new addresses.
Collier
WILLIAM L. CHENERY Editor
CHARLES COLEBAUGH Managing Edil
THOMAS H. BECK Editorial Director
THIS WEEk
MARCH 14, 1942
SHORT STORIES
ERNEST HAYCOX
Second Choice. Old flames i
bright, but dangerous. Page
WILLIAM E. BARRETT
High Island Hero. He learned ab<
heroism—the hard wa'y. Page
PAT FRANK
The Skipper Couldn't Take It. Hap
ending of a story begun at Jutlai
Page
THE SHORT SHORT STORY
Front-Line Photographer, by Pe
Kalischer. Page
SERIAL STORIES
PEARL S. BUCK
China Gold. The sixth of elev
parts. Page
OCTAVUS ROY COHEN
Masquerade in Miami. The tenth
eleven parts. Page
ARTICLES
ARTHUR MANN
Sky Scraper. Cornelius Warmerdi
new boss of the pole vaulters.
Page
OUR FIGHTING MEN. Page
ALICE LEONE MOATS
A Lifeline to the Orient. Bottlene
on Africa's west coast. Page
GENERAL JOHNSON HAGOOD
Unify Our Fighting Forces. So
timely suggestions from an unqu
lioned expert Page
MONA GARDNER
Unorthodox Prima Donna. R
Stevens, who insists on saying
Page
WALTER DAVENPORT
Hampton Fights the Battle of Jeric
How America's Negroes are fight:
for a chance to help. Page
FRELING FOSTER
Keep Up with the World. Fag
WING TALK. Pag
EDITORIALS
Let's Make AH Our Own Rubber.
Sacrifice? Sure. Like It? No.
Don't Lynch Them. Page
COVER HANS GROENHC
PRODUCED BY UNZ.ORG

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